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Emointhekitchen
  • Poppy Balls
    Sweet Stuff

    Poppy Balls

    emointhekitchen Unbaked desserts are a healthy alternative to sweet snacks. Especially in summer, we should avoid baking in the oven, which is more suitable for colder weather. You will need: millet and ground poppy seed (the amount by the number of people) raisins or Goji salt cane sugar or maple syrup (I sometimes use other types of syrups, such as date syrup or wheat syrup) shredded coconut or sesame seeds, you can also try chopped walnuts Alternatively, you will also need plum jam. Mix millet with ground poppy seed in a one-to-one ratio. Add water (use a 3 to 1 water to millet-poppy mixture ratio) and cook together with raisins…

  • The Ancient Art of Tea
    Book Reviews,  China,  The Tea Corner

    The Ancient Art of Tea: Wisdom From the Old Chinese Tea Masters by Warren Peltier

    emointhekitchen I recently received this book with the subtitle Discover Happiness and Contentment in a Perfect Cup of Tea as a gift to my Kindle digital library. Given that books about tea are numerous and many of them passed through my hands, I thought that nothing can surprise me anymore. However, this thin book convinced me that this is not so. As an avid tea drinker and lover of Japanese culture, I have been studying the Urasenke style Japanese tea ceremony. I have read a huge amount of literature on Japanese tea and customs but I have overlooked the original tea culture of ancient China, for which I am somewhat…

  • New Tastes In Green Tea
    Book Reviews,  Japan,  The Tea Corner

    New Tastes In Green Tea: A Novel Flavor for Familiar Drinks, Dishes, & Desserts By Mutsuko Tokunaga

    emointhekitchen Recently my daughter had the twelfth birthday. She inherited love for tea and passion for cooking, therefore, she often experiments in the kitchen. I was trying to choose a gift for her and at the local bookstore, I came across a unique cookbook with recipes for using green tea both as a beverage & a cooking ingredient by the Japanese food stylist & vice president of the World Green Tea Association Tokunaga Mutsuko. The book includes practical information about green tea and mouthwatering photographs. It begins with the interesting information about different types of green teas and explains the differences in the effects, the amounts of caffeine etc. We…

  • Congee
    Congee,  Treasures of Chinese Dietetics

    Congee – Health, Comfort & Simplicity

    emointhekitchen All over Asia, rice is not just a foodstuff but it has also its fixed place in religious symbolism and rituals, festivals, weddings etc. Rice is perceived as a gift of the gods and meal without rice is not considered a full meal. Rice is not considered to be just an ingredient or a side-dish. There are various one-dish meals of rice soup or porridge cooked with plenty of water or broth (roughly 6 cups of water per 1 cup of rice), called congee. Congee or in mandarin zhōu (jook in Cantonese) is proof that some of the best-tasting things in life are at the same time the simplest. It…

  • Tea Corner
    The Tea Corner

    Tea as a Way of Life

    emointhekitchen There are a lot of literary works, poetry, scientific, medical and philosophical essays dedicated to this noble beverage. I don’t wanna add to this pile but just share a few inner feelings of mine. When talking about tea I am very biased. I love its gentle influence on senses. As a European, I used to drink just a black tea with lemon and sugar or milk all my childhood. However, in the 90ties there was a massive wave of establishing teahouses in Japanese and Chinese style all over my hometown and I have discovered the real poetry of tea drinking. Gradually I came to the conclusion, that you don’t…

  • Shitake in the jar
    Mushrooms,  Treasures of Chinese Dietetics

    Mushrooms – Part One

    emointhekitchen In China and Japan, some types of edible mushrooms have been used and worshipped for over 3,000 years. They are used both in medicine and in the kitchen for their extraordinary properties. In this post, I would like to mention at least three of them. I have chosen these particular mushrooms because they belong to my favourites and are available outside Asia in fresh or dried form for culinary purposes not just as Dietary Supplements. It is noteworthy that mushrooms, unlike most other ingredients commonly used in cooking, have strong effects. To me, they were always more medicine than food. In other words, it is always necessary to consider…

  • Dairy Homemade Yoghurt
    Dairy,  Other Stuff

    A few thoughts about dairy

    emointhekitchen not just from the TCM point of view These days there are a lot of scientific and less scientific studies on milk and other dairy products, many of them contradictory. However, let’s think of common sense. None of the other mammals except us normally consume milk after the end of the lactation period. Enzymes that help to digest breast milk gradually disappear from the body with age. Humans, though, have developed a genetic exception to that rule a few millennia ago. Lactase persistence gene A gene called “lactase persistence gene” which has evolved among people in Europe and Saharan Africa makes some of us able to keep making the…

  • Job's tears
    Job's-tears,  Treasures of Chinese Dietetics

    Job’s-tears

    emointhekitchen “Job’s tears” is an important part of Chinese dietetics. The home of this plant is China and India. It grows at higher altitudes, where rice and corn growing is not too successful. The name “Job’s tears” refers to the drip-like shape of seeds and the biblical figure of Job, a representative of great sorrow. The oldest story tied to this plant comes from China. Approximately in the year 41 AD, the Chinese emperor sent General Ma Yuan to suppress the rebellion on the southwest border. In these areas, there was a hot and humid climate that encouraged the spread of various contagious diseases. The local population prevented the infections…

  • Kimchi-jjigae
    Indian summer,  Korea,  Soups,  Summer

    Kimchi-jjigae (Rich Korean Soup)

    emointhekitchen Traditionally this soup could be served in a large pot in the middle of the table. The whole family would meet and share the meal from the shared pot. It is a bit like a Chinese hot pot or a French fondue. Hot pots, as well as fondue, are very social dinning methods so if you are kinda shy and not at ease with “hot potting” you are of course free to use individual bowls for serving. Children, however, usually love this kind of pastime. Therefore, if you are a larger family with kids I suggest you give it a try. You will certainly enjoy a lot of fun.…

  • okra soup
    Indian summer,  Soups,  Summer

    Okra Soup

    emointhekitchen This soup, in my opinion, fits both summer and the Indian summer. Thanks to okra, tomatoes and eggplants this dish is quite cool in nature. You will need: 500g of beef 2 bigger potatoes 1 onion sliced on wheels 100 g of butter (or healthier olive oil) 3-4 tomatoes 1 large red pepper 100 g of okra 2 eggplants 100 g green beans coriander, basil, parsley, salt, pepper Rinse the meat, cut into cubes and put it into the large pot. Add about 1 litre of cold water and boil on a mild flame for about half an hour. In other pot sauté the onions with the knob of…

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