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Emointhekitchen
  • Armenian Tabouleh
    Armenia,  Salads

    Armenian Tabouleh

    emointhekitchen This Armenian bulgur salad is called eech and it is very similar to tabouleh. However, while most ingredients in tabouleh remain in raw form, eech is, on the contrary, more or less cooked food. I prefer this Armenian version for its better digestibility. 1 chopped onion 4 crushed cloves of garlic 2 cups of chopped tomatoes pinch of black pepper pinch of chilli powder 1 cup of hot water 2 cups grade #1 bulgur lemon juice or apple vinegar chopped scallions and parsley arugula leaves extra virgin olive oil In a pan or pot sauté the onions and the garlic until the onion begins to be translucent. Add the…

  • Bozbash
    Armenia,  Indian summer,  Soups,  Summer

    Bozbash (Slightly sour Armenian soup)

    emointhekitchen The name of this dish was first mentioned in 1883 by Mirza ‘Ali Akbar Khan Aashpazbashi the head cook at the Persian court of Naser-al-din Shah in his cookbook Sofreh At’ameh’. Different variants of this thick and hearty soup can be found in Iran, Azerbaijan, Turkey and Armenia. While my Armenian version is rather cooler in nature and therefore fit into summer or Indian summer, the Iranian version Abgousht Bozbash, on the other hand, fits in very cold days since it contains many warming ingredients: lamb, turmeric, cinnamon etc. For Armenian Bozbash you will need: 500 g of diced beef 1 chopped onion 3 tablespoons of extra virgin olive…

  • Finikia Greek Pastries
    Armenia,  Greece,  Sweet Stuff,  Winter

    Finikia – Greek Pastries

    emointhekitchen Finikia is a type of Greek cookie. This is the Armenian variant that I learned from a friend from Yerevan. Greece and Armenia have always had a very friendly relationship, which is reflected also in the mutual exchange of recipes. In Armenia and I guess that also in Greece, these pastries are usually served at Christmas.  These are the healthier variant of sometimes too fatty and too sweet pastries served in festive time. There is no need to use butter, eggs or milk so you don’t compromise your diet that much and don’t have to live on baking soda to regain normal digestion. I kept the recipe in its…

  • Spas - Armenian Yoghurt Soup
    Armenia,  Dairy,  Soups,  Summer

    Spas (Armenian Yoghurt Soup)

    emointhekitchen Because of significantly cold properties of yoghurt, this soup is particularly suited to hot summer weather. We can serve it cold as a gazpacho or hot if you need to reduce its coldness. Also, the choice of the kind of broth affects the final properties of the food. If you choose a vegetable broth, it will have a cooler character than with the chicken broth. Although wheat is more traditional in Armenian cuisine, if you suffer weakened digestion, rice should be your first choice. You will need: 1/2 cup peeled wheat or rice 2 tablespoons flour 4 cups white greek type yoghurt 1 beaten egg 1 chopped onion 2…

  • Indian Chicken Saag
    India,  Meat and Poultry,  Winter

    Indian Chicken Saag

    emointhekitchen The myth that spinach is a huge reservoir of iron is very old. Already in 1870 a doctor. E. von Wolf published a study claiming that spinach has ten times more iron than other leafy vegetables. The true Spinach fever occurred in the thirties of the twentieth century and was caused by Popeye the sailor who owed spinach for his giant muscles. However, in 1937, German scientists came to the conclusion that spinach had only a tenth of the amount of iron originally assumed. E. von Wolf apparently caused this error by inadvertently moving the decimal point so that the spinach does not contain 30 mg of iron but…

  • Chinese Daikon Soup
    Autumn,  China,  Recipes,  Soups

    Light Chinese Daikon Soup

    emointhekitchen The old Chinese proverb says, “As soon as farmers bring the daikon to the market, doctors are losing their jobs.” You will need: 1 small daikon radish a small piece of grated ginger approximately one tablespoon of dried tangerine peel three-quarters of a litre of water or vegetable stock salt, spring onion, coriander, parsley, pepper, sesame oil, rice vinegar Cut daikon into cubes, and together with ginger and tangerine peel put into the pot. Sauté the mixture in a drop of sesame oil and then pour it over with water or with a broth. Cover with a lid and cook for about 30 minutes until the radish becomes soft.…

  • Armenian borsch
    Armenia,  Recipes,  Soups

    Armenian Borsch

    emointhekitchen Borsch is usually beet-root based a slightly sour soup popular in Eastern European cuisines. There is an awful lot of ways to cook it. Recipes differ considerably from one another. In every country, borsch is a bit different. Some countries even have several variants of this soup. Here I am mentioning one of the Armenian recipes, which in my opinion is of the most balanced composition. I will not deal with individual ingredients as in most of my other recipes, because this soup is simply an example of combining different kinds of vegetables and meat into one harmonic whole. According to the traditional Chinese medicine approach, I would say that this soup…

  • Kuzu
    Kudzu,  Treasures of Chinese Dietetics

    Kuzu (Kudzu)

    emointhekitchen Pueraria lobata, widely known as kudzu or kuzu is (at least by my opinion) very strange and wicked plant. It reminds me of the tale of Sleeping Beauty in which a prince must overcome a wall of roses to get to his lovely one. However, the reward is worth the effort and the obstacles. To North America, it was probably brought from its native homeland Asia or South America. While in China and Japan, as well as in Peru, it is highly valued for its curative effects and a wide range of uses in gastronomy and agriculture, for the United States it means something like a plague. The plant is similar to ivy or, for example,…

  • Goji
    Goji,  Treasures of Chinese Dietetics

    Goji Berry (Wolfberries)

    emointhekitchen In the Tang Dynasty (618 – 907 AD), use of the plant as a tonic increased after a poet said: “it tastes like sweet dew and promotes longevity with a spoon’s chew.” In the Song Dynasty (960 – 1279 AD), commoners made it a tribute food and they sent it to the Imperial Court frequently. In China circulates some short funny stories about goji: “The simple traveller walked through the village of Si-che when his attention was caught by a special scene. A twenty-one-year-old girl was beating an old grey man with a stick. The wanderer wanted to stand up for him because he thought he was about 80 years old. So he asked her why…

  • Bulgur and Lentil Salad
    Grains and Legumes,  Recipes,  Salads

    Bulgur and Lentil Salad

    emointhekitchen Bulgur is a cereal food made from the parboiled groats of pasta wheat. This dish comes originally from Turkish cuisine. Later, its consumption spread throughout the Arab world and eventually to all other countries. You will need: 1 cup of dried lentils (or 1 can of cooked lentils) 1 cup bulgur (I am using medium grind size but it’s completely up to you) 1 large carrot parsley, coriander, salt, pepper, lemon juice (approx. from 1 middle sized lemon) Cook the lentils well if using dried (if you are prone to flatulence, cook it with a pinch of Japanese nori seaweed). Boil the water separately, pour over the bulgur so…

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